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11 March 2013 9:53 PM
Robby Rowley


The theory of sleep. Though widely accepted around the world, it is quite the controversy at the International Academy of Macomb. Here at the IAM, many students know this notion of sleep to be a misconception, made up by conspiracy theorists, and dog-lovers. The other, well-rested, opinion at the school can be expressed in a short sentence. "Sorry, I'm doing homework, talk to you later". Friends of these unfortunately infected with " a good night's sleep"  know they won't be heard from for some time. Since the end of the summer break, students of the IAM have shown an amazing capacity to evade sleep both through means of sheer willpower, and the ability to down more caffeine than is deemed safe for an especially stout grizzly bear.

    Yes, this thing called sleep has its pros and its cons. The former coming in the form of extra time to make up for procrastination, more time for procrastination, and if one is very careful in abstaining from sleep an adventure with an illusory moose, but that is what is called a hallucination and if you begin seeing these moose you should probably get a little bit of sleep. Only a little. The proposed pros of sleep include, increased mental capability, not dying after eleven days, and lighter colored skin underneath one's eyes. But sleep should be disregarded as leading experts say "Sleep is to school as performance enhancing drugs are to sports, it is immoral, and only for those that don't like a bit of a challenge".

    All speculative science, and teasing of a sore subject aside, sleep in the IAM is a widely debated subject, some believe, because it's not part of the "IB learner profile" the IBO doesn't take it into account when designing their curriculum. Others seem to have no problem with sleep but find life outside of academic and sleeping boundaries lacking.

    No matter what people think it is widely accepted that eight to ten hours of sleep makes a healthy person, along with breathing oxygen and eating various forms of sugar, proteins, and carbohydrates. School ends at approximately 2:30, sometimes there are clubs that last until 4:00, and the students that live furthest from the school have a about a 40 minute commute. At latest a student will get home at 5:00. Given that on average students receive 4 hours of homework (This is how much time it would take to do it properly, not necessarily what is done) They will do their homework for about two hours until dinner then complete the remaining from 8:00 until 10:00. The latest most students can get up in order to catch a bus is 6:00. This means that those hard-working students that participate in after school activities, so common here, have no free time to relax and calm down after an arduous day. Even if they get the minimum amount of recommended sleep.

    Upon inquiry of sleep to one IAM student they replied "I don't know what that is" in assuming this is a common occurrence here is an explanation: Sleep, a naturally occurring event that includes suspension of consciousness, occasionally vivid visualizations that don't cohere with reality, and upon completion the "sleeper" has elevated energy levels, unlike what you get from caffeine, if you don't know this feeling, it can't be explained.

    This busy schedule doesn't provide any flexibility for students aspiring in things not so academic: social experiences, gaining skills in things not taught at school, and learning how to participate in the "actual" world. The intelligent students they are, those that go to the IAM won't stand for this kind of deprivation and opt for a deprivation of another sort. The lack of sleep students have isn't from not being hard-working enough. Everyone at the IAM works an incredible amount compared to any other school the IAM is made up of. No, the lack of sleep at the IAM comes from the students' amazing ability not to give up, and wanting to make themselves better people. So there.
   
    And this, is one extremely sleep-deprived writer, signing off.

 

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